Earlier this week, I was tasked with sending a newsletter out to more than 1000 of my client’s customers. Not too difficult, right? They provided me with an Excel spreadsheet of their customers’ email addresses, and I just uploaded it to MailChimp, my preferred newsletter service. Unfortunately, MailChimp had to stop the email campaign because 25 of the first 100 emails bounced. I received this warning from MailChimp:

Bounce rates must be maintained at industry thresholds. They usually occur when the email address is not valid or no longer exists. When these values are exceeded, internet service providers and anti-spam organizations begin to question the integrity of the list, the sending domain, and IP addresses associated with the sender. This has a negative impact on our sending reputation due to blocks issued by these outside organizations.

Before we can support sending to the data that was deleted, we recommend re-confirming the email addresses through double opt-in methods. This will ensure that all subscribers on the list expect to receive the content you send, avoid excessive bounce rates and complaints, but also to ensure the best possible results for your campaigns.

If you believe that you have permission to contact these individuals on a one to one basis, then you may want to send a reconfirmation email outside of our service so they can opt-in via a double opt-in process.

The email list was legit, it was just manually typed. My client’s customers didn’t sign up for their newsletter through an online form, they subscribed by writing their email addresses down on a peace of paper. With some people’s handwriting being hard to read along with typos, mistakes are bound to happen. I didn’t want to manually verify 1000+ emails, so I looked for a quicker solution. After a few minutes of searching on Google, I found BulkEmailVerifier.com.

Over 1000 Emails Verified in Less Than 1 Hour

I tested the website by entering a few valid and invalid email addresses from MailChimp’s failed campaign report, and the results were consistent. Verifying individual email addresses was free, but bulk verifying was a paid service. Prices vary depending on the amount of emails that need to be verified. I had less than 1500 email addresses to verify, so I only had to pay $19. In less than 1 hour, I was notified that the email list had been processed.

Bulk Email Verifier Results

I downloaded the “Deliverable – OK” email list, uploaded it to MailChimp, and sent the newsletter to the rest of subscribers that didn’t receive the 1st email newsletter. You might be wondering what the “Unknown” emails are. When I moused over the “What’s this?” link, I received this tip:

UNKNOWN is where the email address passes syntax and MX checks, but we can’t say with a high degree of certainty whether the email address mailbox is valid or not. This can be because the recipient’s mail server was temporarily down, or because their mail server always returns OK (catch-all).

I didn’t send any newsletters to the 227 unknown emails, but I’m thinking about it. I’m still glad that I found this website though. If I had to manually verify every one of these email addresses, I would have spent at least a full work day, but thanks to BulkEmailVerifier.com, I was able to accomplish this task in minutes.